HISTORIC CHURCH IN KOLKATA

St John's church in Kolkata, dates from 1787

 

St John’s Anglican Church was among the first public buildings erected by the East India Company when Calcutta became the official capital of British India in 1772. Its foundation stone was laid by the first Governor General of India, Warren Hastings, on 6th April 1784 and the church opened for worship in 1787. Built of stone from the ruins of the ancient Bengali town of Gaur, St John’s bears a passing resemblance to the 13th century church of St Martins-in-the-Fields in London. Its neo-classic style architecture is topped by a similar spire inset with a giant clock said to have been wound every day since its construction. Whether you are a Christian or not, a reason to visit St John’s is that its compound houses a monument in memory of the soldiers who suffocated in a small room in Fort William following the British surrender of Calcutta to the Nawab of Bengal, Siraj ud-Daulah, in April 1756. Of the 146 prisoners crammed in overnight, only 43 were still alive when the cell was unlocked next morning ——the dead, with no room to fall, remained on their feet. The lexicon “black hole of Calcutta” has entered the English language to mean anywhere small, dark and claustrophobic. The room concerned is said to have measured only 14x18feet.

An obelisk commemorating the lives lost on that terrible night was removed in 1821. The new Viceroy of India, Lord Curzon, built a new memorial in 1901, but due to the sensitivities of the Indian independence movement, it was taken to its present site in the shady compound of St John’s Church. Located on Netaji Subhash (NS) Road, St John’s is a quiet oasis in the maelstrom of modern-day Kolkata. Your transport can drive in and park outside the entrance of the church (leave a tip for the gate keeper on your way out).

Monument to the 123 men who died in the Black Hole of Calcutta

Monument to the 123 deceased in the Black Hole of Calcutta, 1756


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THE CAMINO DE SANTIAGO DE COMPOSTELA

DAY 25 ON THE CAMINO TO SANTIAGO DE COMPOSTELA

The Camino de Santiago, or the Way of St James, has been a Christian pilgrimage route since at least the 9th century. Winding  some 800 kilometres from France across northern Spain, it ends at the Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela, the resting place of James the Apostle.

Former Qantas hostess, and mother of five, Australian Trish Clark, has walked the Camino and written a guide for those who want to follow in her footsteps. Below is a soupçon of her experience.

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Throughout much of my life the Camino had been like a siren call, challenging me to follow this medieval pilgrim trail and finally, with the children grown up,  I set out.

The walk started at St Jean de Pied de Port, in the foothills of the French Pyrenees, before heading west through a countryside dotted with rustic villages, until ending in Santiago de Compostela in north west Spain..

Glorious view over the Pyrenees. www.guidetothecamino.com

VIEW OF THE CAMINO IN THE FRENCH PYRENEES

I was soon to discover the pilgrimage is not for the faint-hearted. A physical wreck after the first day, I thought I had made a terrible mistake.

I was on my own, and missing a yellow directional arrow, I walked an unnecessary 10 km. before stumbling into a village with one thought: I cannot keep this up for 6 weeks. I will return to St Jean and make my way home to Sydney.

DAY 20 - 1

NOT ALL PILGRIMS MAKE IT

But the following morning, I experienced the first miracle of my Camino. I awoke refreshed with not an ache, or a blister and after a hearty breakfast, I strode out of town on a high.

Keeping the arrows in sight, I travelled light, carrying a 24 litre backpack and overnighting in guesthouses and pilgrim hostels along the way.

Trish with Swedish friend Maria, taking time out in Navarette. www.guidetothecamino.com

WITH A SWEDISH PILGRIM IN NAVARETE, LA RIOJA PROVINCE OF SPAIN

On reaching Santiago after 34 days, I presented a passport stamped from each location. The reward —a treasured Compostela certificate. And following the custom, I attended a pilgrim celebration Mass, held daily at noon in the magnificent 12th century Baroque cathedral.

CHRISTIAN pilgrims outside Santiago cathedral CHR156A12PG copy

PILGRIMS CELEBRATE OUTSIDE THE CATHEDRAL OF SANTIAGO DE COMPOSTELA

Once the domain of the penitent, the Camino now attracts all sorts of people from church groups, to fitness fanatics and tourists.

As well as those walking to honour their faith, I met others in search of themselves, one training for a marathon, another making the trek in gratitude for recovering from an illness and one man who made it known to every female pilgrim that he was looking for a wife (I later heard that  he was unsuccessful).

I still think about the Camino frequently. Following the yellow arrows taught me much about myself, about freedom, about perseverance, about trusting God and about the abundant joys of leading a simple life.

Near Granon on the Camino to Belorado. www.guidetothecamino.com

www.guidetothecamino.com

Also by Trish Clark, a guide to Convent and Monastery accommodation in Europe.

www.goodnightandgodbless.com


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JERUSALEM: FOCUS FOR THREE GREAT RELIGIONS

Jerusalem as it looked in Jesus' time old litho

JERUSALEM AS IT MAY HAVE LOOKED AT THE TIME OF CHRIST

A holy city for Judaism, Christianity and Islam, Jerusalem is central to the beliefs of all three religions. Indeed some early maps depict the ancient walled city as the centre of the world. Venerated and fought over, Jerusalem has been razed and rebuilt more than a dozen times. In 1981, both the Old City containing the sacred sites and its Ottoman-built walls, were inscribed on the World Heritage List.

Armenian priests in Old City of Jerusalem

ARMENIAN PRIESTS IN THE OLD CITY

Divided into four distinct quarters: Christian, Jewish, Muslim and Armenian, the meandering, crowded heart of Jerusalem is visited by some 3.5 million  tourists a year, the majority from America followed by Russia, then France.

Local guides know that a priority for Christian visitors is the Church of the Holy Sepulchre believed built on the site where Jesus was crucified and where his body was anointed on the Stone of Unction, located just inside the main entrance.

Church of Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem

CHURCH OF THE HOLY SEPULCHRE, FOUNDED BY EMPEROR CONSTANTINE IN 335 CE

Italian pilgrims pressing material into the `stone of unction` Holy Sepulchre church Jerusalem

ITALIAN PILGRIMS AT THE ‘STONE OF THE UNCTION’

The church is divided into zones administered by different custodians: Greek Orthodox, Franciscan, Coptic Christian, Armenian and Ethiopian Orthodox whose recorded presence in Jerusalem dates from the 4th Century and who are allocated the roof.

Inside the Church of the Holy Sepulchre

LOOKING UP AT THE DOME, CHURCH OF THE HOLY SEPULCHRE

The next most sacred site for Christian pilgrims is the Garden Tomb from where it is believed Christ rose from the dead and ascended into Heaven. (Matthew 28:1-10). Within the Old City, scores of other holy sites include the Stations of the Cross where Christ walked along the winding route known as the Via Dolorosa.

Religious tour group at the Garden Tomb in Jerusalem

RELIGIOUS TOUR GROUP AT THE GARDEN TOMB

Station V on the via Dolorosa

STATION V ON THE VIA DOLOROSA WHERE JESUS WALKED TO HIS CRUCIFIXION

In the heart of Jerusalem is the Temple Mount, al-Haram ash-Sharif in Arabic (Noble Sanctuary) enclosing 35 acres of gardens, fountains and religious buildings of immense significance for Muslims, and also for Jews.

The Dome of the Rock in Jerusalem in the heart of the Old City.

THE DOME OF THE ROCK, MUSLIM SHRINE ON THE TEMPLE MOUNT

At its southern end of the sanctuary is Al-Aqsa Mosque, dating from 705 CE the focus for Jerusalem’s Muslim community. Hosting daily prayers, the mosque can accommodate 5,000 worshippers on  holy days such as eid al-fitr, the feast following the end of the fast month of Ramadan.

Al Aqsa Mosque on the Haram-ash-Sharif is the third most important site in Islam

THE AL-AQSA MOSQUE ON THE TEMPLE MOUNT, THIRD MOST HOLY SITE IN ISLAM

Planted in the centre of the sanctuary is the Dome of the Rock, a gleaming shrine erected over the rock where Muslims believe the Prophet Muhammad made his miraculous “Night Journey” into Heaven. Jewish tradition associates the rock as the place where Abraham was willing to sacrifice his son, but was stopped from doing so by an Angel of God. (Genesis 22.2-8). The oldest Islam edifice in Jerusalem, the shrine was raised by the Umayyad Caliph Abd-al-Malik between 688-691 CE.

The Dome of the Rock built on the Haram ash-Sharif .

THE DOME OF THE ROCK, TILEWORK COVERED WITH VERSES FROM THE HOLY QUR’AN

Below the sanctuary is the Western Wall, formerly known as the Wailing Wall, the holiest of sites for Jews who come there to mourn the loss of the Second Temple destroyed by Rome in 70 BCE.

Western Wall from the Second Temple

THE WESTERN WALL, ALL THAT REMAINS OF THE SECOND TEMPLE

Jews from all over the world, come to pray at the wall where they believe God will hear their prayers. The most devout scribble a wish on a scrap of paper and wedge it into gaps between the huge lower stones which date from Herodian times.

Orthodox Jewish men pray at the Western Wall

ORTHODOX JEWS PRAY AT THE WESTERN WALL, MOST SACRED SITE IN JUDAISM

Scraps of paper with requests to God are wedged in gaps between the stones

SCRAPS OF PAPER, WITH REQUESTS TO GOD, ARE JAMMED BETWEEN THE ANCIENT STONES

Pilgrimage tours visiting Jerusalem’s sacred treasures are packaged by many travel agents. It is important to wear comfortable shoes as many sites in the Old City can only be accessed on foot.

Greek Orthodox pilgrims rest tired feet at the entrance to the Church of the Holy Sepulchre

OLD GREEK ORTHODOX PILGRIMS REST THEIR WEARY FEET OUTSIDE THE CHURCH OF THE HOLY SEPULCHRE

 

http://www.viator.com/tours/Jerusalem/Jerusalem-Three-Religions-Holy-City-Walking-Tour/d921-6785JERUS

 

 


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RELIGIOUS TOURISM OVERVIEW

French tour group in st Barbara Coptic christian church in Cairo Egypt

RELIGIOUS TOUR GROUP FROM FRANCE, ST BARBARA COPTIC ORTHODOX CHURCH IN CAIRO

Faith travel is as old as time, but from a niche market associated with church groups, it has grown into a dynamic industry. Along with adventure tourism and eco-tourism, religious tourism has become big business, estimated to be worth $18-20 billion worldwide.

While atheists may consider it a curse, religion embraces far more than just belief and worship. Consider it’s influence on dress and diet, sacred sites, ecclesiastical architecture and the associated arts.

One way or another, religion has always impacted on travel. For thousands of years Hindus have trekked to holy places such as Badrinath and Gangotri in northern India while Christian pilgrims have travelled to locations in the Holy Land associated with the ministry of Jesus since at least 4CE.

It is undeniable that religious extremism is impacting on travel in parts of the Middle East and West Africa, but more and more moderate believers are visiting sacred sites associated with their faith.

Australians, who may have never set foot in St Mary’s Cathedral in Sydney, flock to St Peter’s in Rome. French groups book holidays featuring ancient Buddhist cities in Sri Lanka and Coptic churches in Egypt, The hajj (a requisite of Islam that requires all able Muslims make a pilgrimage to the holy shrines in Mecca)—attracts 2 million visitors a year generating some SR32 billion ($8.5 billion) for Saudi Arabia.

The visit of the late Pope Benedict to Sydney in 2008 attracted 223,000 Christian pilgrims from 58 countries. In 2012, thousands of devotees welcomed His Holiness the Dalai Lama to Bodghaya, the place of Buddha’s enlightenment emphasise the economic value of religious tourism, especially for developing nations.

 

Baptist tour group pray together, Lake Galilee

BAPTIST TOURISTS FROM OKLAHOMA WORSHIP ON LAKE GALILEE


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